Primavera de Filippi

Researcher at the National Center of Scientific Research (CNRS) in Paris

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Jej badania koncentrują się na wyzwaniach prawnych i możliwościach technologii blockchain i sztucznej inteligencji, ze szczególnym uwzględnieniem zaufania i zarządzania. Jest autorką książki „Blockchain and the Law”, wydanej przez Harvard University Press. Artystka (http://plantoid.org) i ekspert prawny Creative Commons we Francji. Była członkiem-założycielem Global Future Council on Blockchain Technologies przy Światowym Forum Ekonomicznym i współzałożycielką Internet Governance Forum’s dynamic coalitions on Blockchain Technology (http://coala.global).

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Her research focuses on the legal challenges and opportunities of blockchain technology and artificial intelligence, with a specific focus on trust and governance. She is the author of the book “Blockchain and the Law,” published by Harvard University Press. Artist (http://plantoid.org) and legal expert for Creative Commons in France. She was a founding member of the Global Future Council on Blockchain Technologies at the World Economic Forum, and co-founder of the Internet Governance Forum’s dynamic coalitions on Blockchain Technology (http://coala.global).

10:45 - 11:15

WSPÓŁCZESNE WYZWANIA DZIEŃ 2

AI, ML, IoT i blockchain

FIRESIDE CHAT

 

“AI”, “ML”, “IoT” are all abbreviations fashionable in recent seasons. Together with “blockchain” they are often spoken with one breath. They are all closely related to intangible assets that can be extremely valuable and worth protection. “IP” – Intellectual Property–  yet another popular abbreviation – comes to mind as an obvious means for protection. But, needless to say, the devil is in the details. How exactly IP is or can be applied in most recent technologies and concepts and who exactly owns it? These are not as trivial questions as it sounds.

Patents and copyrights have been designed in an era of steam and iron and, despite evolving, they may – or may not – fit well in the modern world and respond – or not – to the current intellectual property challenges especially in a view of the fact that nowadays inventors quite often recognize IP as Internet Protocol rather than Intellectual Property.

“Blockchain”, “Artificial Intelligence”, “Machine Learning” and “Internet of Things” relate to both software and technology and re-open former ferocious discussions concerning what is better suited to protect programs copyrights (as it used to be) or patents (as it is in some cases).

In the end intellectual property protection is a measure to guard income and a tool to prevent others from taking money that can be yours. Applicability of certain rights is not determined merely by labelling a product, service or enterprise with a catchy “AI”, “ML”, “IoT”. Moreover, in most situations more than one IP right can or should be applied.

We will try to split hairs and address above issues.

 

Prelekcja w języku --> 🇺🇸 

10:45 - 11:15

CONTEMPORARY CHALLENGES Day 2

IP protection of AI and ML

FIRESIDE CHAT

 

“AI”, “ML”, “IoT” are all abbreviations fashionable in recent seasons. Together with “blockchain” they are often spoken with one breath. They are all closely related to intangible assets that can be extremely valuable and worth protection. “IP” – Intellectual Property–  yet another popular abbreviation – comes to mind as an obvious means for protection. But, needless to say, the devil is in the details. How exactly IP is or can be applied in most recent technologies and concepts and who exactly owns it? These are not as trivial questions as it sounds.

Patents and copyrights have been designed in an era of steam and iron and, despite evolving, they may – or may not – fit well in the modern world and respond – or not – to the current intellectual property challenges especially in a view of the fact that nowadays inventors quite often recognize IP as Internet Protocol rather than Intellectual Property.

“Blockchain”, “Artificial Intelligence”, “Machine Learning” and “Internet of Things” relate to both software and technology and re-open former ferocious discussions concerning what is better suited to protect programs copyrights (as it used to be) or patents (as it is in some cases).

In the end intellectual property protection is a measure to guard income and a tool to prevent others from taking money that can be yours. Applicability of certain rights is not determined merely by labelling a product, service or enterprise with a catchy “AI”, “ML”, “IoT”. Moreover, in most situations more than one IP right can or should be applied.

We will try to split hairs and address above issues.

 

Lecture in language —> 🇺🇸